Essay on the Play Trifles - 1729 Words - StudyMode

When first young Maro in his boundless Mind

A Work t' outlast Immortal Rome design'd,

Perhaps he seem'd above the Critick's Law,

And but from Nature's Fountains scorn'd to draw:

But when t'examine ev'ry Part he came,

Nature and Homer were, he found, the same:

Convinc'd, amaz'd, he checks the bold Design,

And Rules as strict his labour'd Work confine,

As if the Stagyrite o'er looked each Line.

Learn hence for Ancient Rules a just Esteem;

To copy Nature is to copy Them.

Script Analysis of "Trifles" by Susan Glaspell Essay …

Whoever thinks a faultless Piece to see,

Thinks what ne'er was, nor is, nor e'er shall be.

In ev'ry Work regard the Writer's End,

Since none can compass more than they Intend;

And if the Means be just, the Conduct true,

Applause, in spite of trivial Faults, is due.

As Men of Breeding, sometimes Men of Wit,

T' avoid great Errors, must the less commit,

Neglect the Rules each Verbal Critick lays,

For not to know some Trifles, is a Praise.

Most Criticks, fond of some subservient Art,

Still make the Whole depend upon a Part,

They talk of Principles, but Notions prize,

And All to one lov'd Folly Sacrifice.


Trifles Argument Free Essays - Free Essay Examples and …

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First follow NATURE, and your Judgment frame

By her just Standard, which is still the same:

Unerring Nature, still divinely bright,

One clear, unchang'd and Universal Light,

Life, Force, and Beauty, must to all impart,

At once the Source, and End, and Test of Art

Art from that Fund each just Supply provides,

Works without Show, and without Pomp presides:

In some fair Body thus th' informing Soul

With Spirits feeds, with Vigour fills the whole,

Each Motion guides, and ev'ry Nerve sustains;

It self unseen, but in th' Effects, remains.

Some, to whom Heav'n in Wit has been profuse.

Want as much more, to turn it to its use,

For Wit and Judgment often are at strife,

Tho' meant each other's Aid, like Man and Wife.

'Tis more to guide than spur the Muse's Steed;

Restrain his Fury, than provoke his Speed;

The winged Courser, like a gen'rous Horse,

Shows most true Mettle when you check his Course.