Some Great Benefits Of Struggle For Civil Rights Essay

History, Art & Archives, U.S. House of Representatives, Office of the Historian, Women in Congress, 1917–2006. Washington, D.C.: U.S. Government Printing Office, 2007. “The Women’s Rights Movement, 1848–1920,” (January 16, 2018)

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129For more information, see Slaughterhouse Cases 83 U.S. 36 (1873), United States v. Cruikshank 92 U.S. 542 (1876), United States v. Reese 92 U.S. 214 (1876), United States v. Harris 106 U.S. 629 (1883), and Civil Rights Cases 109 U.S. 3 (1883). The various cases are discussed in detail in Kermit L. Hall, ed., The Oxford Companion to the Supreme Court of the United States (New York: Oxford University Press, 2002).


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On December 1, 1955, Rosa Parks (1913–2005) refused to move from her seat on a Montgomery, Alabama, bus to make room for whites. She became widely known as the "mother of the Civil Rights movement."


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130Robert J. Cottrol, “Civil Rights Cases,” in Hall, ed., The Oxford Companion to the Supreme Court of the United States: 149.

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Despite the new momentum, however, some reformers were impatient with the pace of change. In 1913 Alice Paul, a young Quaker activist who had experience in the English suffrage movement, formed the rival Congressional Union, later named the National Woman’s Party.8 Paul’s group freely adopted the more militant tactics of its English counterparts, picketing and conducting mass rallies and marches to raise public awareness and support. Embracing a more confrontational style, Paul drew a younger generation of women to her movement, helped resuscitate the push for a federal equal rights amendment, and relentlessly attacked the Democratic administration of President Woodrow Wilson for obstructing the extension of the vote to women.

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History, Art & Archives, U.S. House of Representatives, Office of the Historian, Black Americans in Congress, 1870–2007. Washington, D.C.: U.S. Government Printing Office, 2008. “Rolling Back Civil Rights,” (January 16, 2018)