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THE TITLES OF PLAYS, NOVELS, MAGAZINES, NEWSPAPERS, JOURNALS (things that can stand by themselves) are underlined or italicized. Tennessee Williams' The Glass Menagerie and Toni Morrison's The Bluest Eye don't seem to have much in common at first. If you're using a word processor or you have a fancy typewriter, use italics, but do not use both underlines and italics. (Some instructors have adopted rules about using italics that go back to a time when italics on a word processor could be hard to read, so you should ask your instructor if you can use italics. Underlines are always correct.) The titles of poems, short stories, and articles (things that do not generally stand by themselves) require quotation marks.

Quotes: Remember to lay out quotes correctly. Start a new line and indent like this:

Purdue University students, faculty, and staff at our West Lafayette, IN campus may access this area for information on the award-winning . This area includes Writing Lab hours, services, and contact information.


Chapter objectives& web links are also provided for each chapter.

Winkler, Glendale Community College  Jo Ray McCuen, Glendale Community College

Perhaps it is helpful to think of an essay in terms of a conversation or debate with a classmate. If you and I were discussing whether or not there should be a death penalty in the US, there would be a beginning, middle and end to our conversation. As with a conversation, your essay must be complete, and logically so, leaving no doubt as to your intent or argument. However - again, think of this as a conversation - your essay shouldn't be formal. Remember, you're talking aboutyour ideas and thought processes ... don't try to do that in third person!


oinquisitiveness with regard to a wide range of issues

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Sticking to the Point and Linking Sentences.

A multitude of exercises, assignments,and writing suggestions give students the practice to develop theirwriting, editing, and revising skills while building an understandingof basic grammar.

oconcern to become and remain well-informed

Practical framework of exercises—Includes unittests, talking assignments, writing assignments, and photo writingassignments that ask students to write on a topic suggested by a photograph.

oalertness to opportunities to use critical thinking

Pre- and Post-essay apparatus—Includes sectionsthat introduce each essay, then involve students in comprehensionand critical-thinking questions at the end of each reading.

otrust in the processes of reasoned inquiry

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